All posts by Lindsey Murphy

Recruiting Participants for Camp Noah this Summer!

Fun at Camp NoahWe are eager to get Certified Child Life Specialists and child life students involved with our new partner Camp Noah this summer!  To learn more about our partnership, check out our previous blog post “Partnership with Camp Noah.”  Camp dates and locations are listed below:

June 26-30, 2017           Kern Valley, California
July 10-14, 2017             Kokomo, Indiana
July 10-14, 2017             Rainelle, West Virginia
July 17-21, 2017              Flint, Michigan
July 31-Aug. 4, 2017     Baton Rouge, Louisiana
August 7-11, 2017          St. Cloud, Minnesota
August 7-11, 2017          Middletown, California
August 7-11, 2017          Pine Ridge, South Dakota
TBD                                      Ottawa, Illinois
TBD                                      Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
TBD                                      Roane County, West Virginia

If you live in or near any of these locations and would be interested in participating, please complete the Camp Noah volunteer interest form as soon as possible.

Camp roles include:

Locally Trained Volunteer (open to students and CCLS): The primary role is to support the camp through helping with food, registration, set-up and take-down, etc. Online training is not required.

Certified Camp Staff (open to students and CCLS): The primary role is to enact the camp curriculum and lead and support campers. Online training is required (free to CCLS, reduced cost for CL students).

Mental Health Professional (CCLS only): The primary role of the mental health professional is to be a resource and support to any children or staff with specific mental health needs during the camp. In addition, should the need for additional or ongoing mental health support be assessed, the mental health professional will assist in providing contacts in the community for these ongoing services. Online training is required (free of charge) and a $500 stipend will be offered for full-week commitment to the camp.

 

 

Trauma Training Opportunity!

Addressing Trauma Through a Child’s Eyes:  Pediatric Trauma Informed Care Symposium

ADENA: PACCAR Medical Education Center

Saturday, April 29, 2017

7:55a-12:30p EDT

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss how trauma affects individuals and recognize psychological aspects
  • Recognize how trauma may impact the lifespan of a child
  • Implement trauma informed care within a system

Sessions include: 

  • Trauma Through a Child’s Eyes (Crystal Gilliam, mother)
  • What is Trauma Informed Care (Brian Bethel, Child Protection Center)
  • Psychological Aspects of Trauma (Alyse Klupenger, LISW-S and Julie Oates, LPCC-S)
  • School to Prison Pipeline (Nubia Pena, Education and Prevention Specialist, UCASA)

To register, visit: http://adena.org/meded  and select the calendar date to access the registration portal or call 740-542-3976 by April 22,2017.

Available via Live Broadcast to registered participants:  http://connect.adena.org/CME

For more information visit: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/addressing-trauma-through-a-childs-eyes-pediatric-trauma-informed-care-symposium-tickets-30814933295

“Did You Hear About the Hot Tub in a Tree…

…it’s in a graveyard? Everybody’s talking about it!”

This was perhaps one of my favorite quotes from our recent deployment in Oak Grove and Smithville, MO. It came out of nowhere while a CDS volunteer engaged in sensory play with a child who days prior survived an F3 tornado ripping the roof off her home.

While this child’s parents moved about the Multi Agency Resource Center (MARC) gaining assistance in putting life back together, she found a new friend and was eager to share what was the most interesting part of her day. Not that she lost most of her home and belongings, but rather the irony of a hot tub in a tree in a graveyard.  Amidst, all the loss, it was oddly reassuring to hear this girl speak so frankly about the “word on the street” and it seemed so appropriate for this type of humor to be utilized to connect to others in this stage of her recovery.

Photo credit: 41 Action News

Of course our interest was peaked and we had to find photographic proof later that evening.

As we drove out of the town that evening, peering out our car window was a bit different.  A disaster such as this was very difficult for us to come to grips with as the tornado seemed to strike at random, much like a hot tub perched above tombstones in a tree. One house was flattened while 50 feet away not a single shingle was lost on the neighbors roof. I can only imagine how it must have felt to walk outside after the storm.  One father I spoke with during the day talked about those first few minutes after the storm passed.  “Once my son and I reoriented and realized we were safe, our first few thoughts were of devastation regarding the broken windows and blown out wall in our living room.  However, that quickly passed and we recognized just how lucky we were. I told my son we were lucky to be alive and we had to go help those around us that were hit even worse.  Never did I ever think I would look out  into my backyard at 3am and see people just scrambling through debris searching for treasured items and loved ones.”  Luckily, for this town no “loved ones” were lost.  Working in the MARC, it was obvious this father and son’s actions were shared among many in the community.  Parents and children alike told stories of helping each other out and feeling “lucky.”  Perhaps it was timing (being near St. Patrick’s Day), but I must believe their artwork also depicted this luck and resilience in amazing ways!

Day 2 we returned to Oak Grove. Snow was falling outside! This was a true testament to how quick Missouri weather can change as the day the tornados rolled through the highs were hovering around 80!

We saw 9 kids throughout the day. While the number does not jump out as massive, many of the children spent several hours with us and let me assure you we were BUSY!  On this day another CCLS, Sarah Pfeifer, joined the team. Having a CDS team of 4 came in handy as we were able to tag team children’s needs and support the various energy levels of the children. One particular three-year-old stood out as she continuously wanted to check in with her caregiver.  It was interesting to see the separation anxiety, recognizing the developmentally appropriateness, but also the deviation of that given the recent disaster.  Her need to check in was definitely elevated, it was nice to have enough volunteers in the center to be able to support her in checking in so frequently with her caregiver.

Another family came in to us mid-afternoon that warmed our hearts. Four siblings had experienced a total loss of their home. They were living with friends, had all new clothes, and had obviously been through a great deal of stress. It was neat to see the way these siblings were treating each other.  As we can imagine, a typical day must involve some bickering and tiffs, but not today.  The girls played cards together, the boys jumped in to teach them a new card game.  The camaraderie and gentleness with which they spoke with each other was so special, something not often seen between siblings.

On Sunday, we moved to a 2nd MARC location in Smithville, MO about 50 miles away.  For those of you trying to follow along, Missouri got hit by several tornadoes on the same night – in all corners of the state – Northwest, Central, Southeast, etc. We were lucky enough to have CLDR members respond to each MARC that was setup – Perryville, Oak Grove, and Smithville!

Exhaustion…it was interesting to see the energy level difference as the days went on. Friday, in Oak Grove, kids sought parachute games and bean bag tosses. Sunday the kids in Smithville were drawn to chalk drawings and rice play. It marked nearly a week since the tornado, much of the adrenaline rush  had seized and the children seemed tired.  One child slept in the corner, while another created a masterpiece drawing.

At this MARC it was interesting to see the number of caregivers that approached us for advice on how to help their children cope and what to expect or do to assist in this process.  I spoke with a grandmother who was primary caregiver for her 3 year old grandchild, “she just keeps asking when she gets to go back to her home, sleep in her room…how do I tell her never?”  We talked about finding something from the child’s home that would mean something to her…the grandmother said the only thing she has found thus far is a broken Paw Patrol plate she used to eat on…I told her that was perfect!  It may or may not mean something now, but as the child grows it will be important for her to have something concrete to hold onto from her early years.

Another dad I spoke with described the challenges with trying to maintain routine, boundaries, and order in this chaotic situation.  His house had minor damage, however, he graciously opened his doors to his brother and his family who lost their entire home.  The result was 5 teenagers all under the same roof in tight quarters.  “At first it was like a fun sleepover, but now those feelings have worn off and they are starting to get at each others throats….my kids are used to cleaning up after themselves, but my niece and nephew are leaving soda cans all over the place…it’s just not how we are used to our house functioning.”  We talked about having open communication and engaging them in creating a new normal with shared expectations and rules.  He was hesitant at first, but once I explained how creating these together can invigorate feelings of control and empowerment, while setting boundaries and routine assists in establishing feelings of safety I saw a sense of relief flush over his face.  It was in these moments that I was reminded just how much my experience working with children and families in the hospital mirrored the work we were doing with families in this setting – empowering, educating, and supporting them to best support their children in times of chaos and stress.

As a mother to a 3 year old and full time PhD student this was the perfect opportunity to deploy. I was close to home and had the ability to tap friends and family for help. Thanks to my brother in law for picking up my son Friday afternoon and driving him to my parents in St. Louis for a fun filled weekend with his Mimi and Papa. Special kudos to my husbands co-worker for agreeing to take care of our two labs whose favorite past time is barking at strangers. And finally my father for meeting me an hour away from home Monday morning so I could hug, kiss, and squeeze my son as soon as possible.

This experience was very special to me for many reasons. One very special part was that joining me on this journey were two volunteers that share my last name! My husband and mother-in-law deployed as CDS volunteers all 3 days. It was so wonderful to have them along and watch them lift the spirits of the many families we served.

 

 

 

CLDR responds with CDS to EF-3 Tornado in Perryville, MO

CREDIT CAROLINA HIDALGO | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Children’s Disaster Services (CDS) has been asked by the American Red Cross to serve in a Multi-Agency Resource Center in Perryville, Missouri in response to an EF-3 tornado that hit Tuesday night.  We are fortunate to have Rachel Erler, a University of Missouri child life student and Child Life Disaster Relief member joining the CDS team to help support the children and families involved.  The tornado ripped through the town causing severe damage to over 100 homes, 60 being total losses.  Please keep the families, children, community, and volunteers in your thoughts and prayers as they recover from this devastating disaster.

CREDIT CAROLINA HIDALGO | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Our Hearts Go Out To Chattanooga, Tennessee

Our hearts go out to the victims, families, first responders, hospital and school personnel, and child life specialists in Chattanooga, TN involved with the school bus crash today.

Children near and far can experience trauma related to this event.  For a great resource providing tips on talking with children after a traumatic event, please visit:

http://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/tips-talking-to-children-after-traumatic-event.pdf 

Additionally, here is a resource for educators providing tips on how to approach and support grieving students:

https://grievingstudents.org/ 

 

Deployment Alert: Hurricane Matthew

arc1We have a Certified Child Life Specialist and child life student deploying with our partner, Children’s Disaster Services, to Fayetteville, NC to assist in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew.  This particular disaster has been extra complicated to get services into for many reasons, so we are excited to start serving!  The team will be working in a Red Cross shelter housing 48 residents and 11 young children, whom will likely be there for a while.  Please keep the entire team, our child life friends, and of course the disaster victims and survivors in your thoughts as they continue to recover from this devastating storm.

*Check back often for updates from the team!

 

 

Deployment Alert: Louisiana flooding

Huffingtonpost.com/Associated Press
Huffingtonpost.com/Associated Press

IMMEDIATE NEED:

We are seeking CDS Certified volunteers to deploy immediately to the disastrous flooding in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  Just yesterday there were approximately 500 people in shelters and overnight that number has risen to over 5,000.  Please contact Kathy Fry-Miller (Kfry-miller@brethren.org) if you are available to deploy anytime in the near future, beginning as soon as the next day or two, it would be helpful to put subject line “LA flooding deployment availability.”

FUTURE NEEDS:

National American Red Cross has also asked us to have teams on call the next several months as they prepare for a tough hurricane season compounded by the continuous floods we have experienced this year already!   If you could also send your potential availability for the next several months via e-mail to Kathy Fry-Miller (Kfry-miller@brethren.org) we would greatly appreciate having your potential availability in the database, it would be helpful to put subject line “Availability Fall 2016.”

Thank you so much in advance for your response to these requests, especially the urgent one in Louisiana.  As always, feel free to contact Child Life Disaster Relief directly if you have further questions at CLDisasterrelief@gmail.com.